This is why you should be in London in march

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This is why you should be in London in march Photo by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0

Pancake Day is traditionally known as Shrove Tuesday and is historically a religious occasion relating to the Christian feast of Easter.

Pancake Day is traditionally known as Shrove Tuesday and is historically a religious occasion relating to the Christian feast of Easter. - See more at: http://www.followuk.co.uk/pancake-day#sthash.xgTGlncZ.dpuf

 

Pancake Day is traditionally known as Shrove Tuesday and is historically a religious occasion relating to the Christian feast of Easter. - See more at: http://www.followuk.co.uk/pancake-day#sthash.xgTGlncZ.dpuf

 

It has become commonly known as ‘Pancake Day’ as it is a day when families observe the tradition of cooking and eating pancakes. Shrove Tuesday is also known by other names around the world, including ‘Fat Tuesday’ and ‘Mardi Gras’ and it`s the last day before the start of Lent, which begins with Ash Wednesday and is an important time in the Christian calendar as it prepares worshippers for Easter.

Pancake Day is now celebrated by non-Christians and non-religious families throughout the UK, with many households enjoying making and eating pancakes.

 

Traditional pancake races

One of the big things in London is the traditional pancake Races, which happens all over London and helps raise money for charity every year. The biggest event is The Great Spitalfields Pancake Race. Teams of 4 race along Bricklane, with their fryingpan in hand, trying to get through the tricky course and become the winner of the engraved frying pan.

You can enjoy the countless types of pancakes available and the live music played all day. The first race starts at 12:30pm.

 

How much you can eat?

Lots of local London restaurants have a pancake challenge, where you have a set time limit to eat a certain amount of pancakes. The most popular on is held at the cafés called The Breafast Club, in Angel, Hoxton, Soho and Spitalfields. Once you place your order of 12 Pancakes, you are given 15 minutes to clean your plate. If you fail to clean your plate in the allotted time, you will then have to fork out £17.50 to pay for your meal, which is donated straight to the Rays of Sunshine Childrens Charity, which supports children with serious illnesses.

Before you start thinking that 12 pancakes would be easy, the pancakes served are not the thin traditional british pancake, they are the full american thick pancakes, covered in maple syrup and cream and berries, so if you think you’ve got the stomach for it, why not give it a try. At least if you lose, your money will go to a worthy cause.

>>Pay-per-minute cafe opens in London

 

 

 

 

 

it has become commonly known as ‘Pancake Day’ as it is a day when families observe the tradition of cooking and eating pancakes - See more at: http://www.followuk.co.uk/pancake-day#sthash.xgTGlncZ.dpuf

 

Last modified on Sunday, 16 February 2014 12:11

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